Human Figure In Drawing In Landscape

pencil drawings Human Figure In Drawing In Landscape

Human Figure In Drawing In Landscape

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“Campo writes restless, worldly narrative poems, often rhyming, that take—and unapologetically engage—the world as it presents itself. . . . [H]is insouciant, call-them-as-I-seem-them descriptions are luminous, addressing the ravages of AIDS, particularly, with care and respect.” — Publishers Weekly

“In his fourth and most compelling collection of poetry, physician Rafael Campo confirms his status as one of America’s most important poets. His stunning, candid poems . . . rise with equal beauty from a Boston tenement or a moonlit Spanish plaza, yet remain unafraid to explore and celebrate his identity as a doctor, and Cuban gay man.’” —Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

“[A] pleasant and accessible fourth collection of poetry . . . . [T]he gentle, regular rhythms of [Campo’s] poems give them a sense of quiet control. . . . Contemplative, hopeful, and heartfelt. . . .” —Chelsey Johnson, Out

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“[M]ature and riveting. . . . [Campo’s] ability to write without emotional restraint, and yet without emotional excess, gives readers a glimpse into a fully human life, one beset with contradictions and imperfections that mirror the world’s. . . . [I]n these well-crafted and well-ordered poems that accrue, in collection, both depth and relevance. Campo, writing at top form for several years, sustains and deepens his voice in this volume. Exploring material he has examined in previous collections, he goes closer to the bone here, displaying a new vulnerability within the framework of precisely crafted poems. As always, Campo’s work is visceral, electric, romantic, and haunting.” — Cortney Davis, Medical Humanities Review

“[M]ature and riveting. . . . [Campo’s] ability to write without emotional restraint, and yet without emotional excess, gives readers a glimpse into a fully human life, one beset with contradictions and imperfections that mirror the world’s. . . . [I]n these well-crafted and well-ordered poems that accrue, in collection, both depth and relevance. Campo, writing at top form for several years, sustains and deepens his voice in this volume. Exploring material he has examined in previous collections, he goes closer to the bone here, displaying a new vulnerability within the framework of precisely crafted poems. As always, Campo’s work is visceral, electric, romantic, and haunting.” —Cortney Davis, Medical Humanities Review

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Again, a bright orange dress against an intense blue door will look like a dark dress against a pale door. In actual drawing, also, a photograph will be sometimes misleading, as mentioned (p. 8 I), and it is well known how a building may be made to look of a monstrous size, when it is really small, simply by contrivance in placing the figures, and the height at which the camera stands, or high mountains may look poor and low by introducing too much foreground.

It is very seldom that any one possesses these proportions exactly, though some have been known to do so, but the more nearly they tend towards them the finer or more noble will the figure appear. As a rule, in nature the head is larger, say one-seventh, the fork lower down, and consequently the legs and feet shorter. The hands nearly always keep their place on the legs, and are therefore with the arm longer than the Greek proportion. In fact we generally approach more nearly to the ape than the classical figure above. It is well, however, always to bear the true proportion in mind, and see how nearly the figure you are drawing approaches them, and then make your study. The length of one-sixth for the feet is scarcely ever found in nature, and if so it looks very large. A proportion of one-seventh is better, i.e. a man six feet high would have a foot ten and a half inches, or a woman five feet three inches high, a foot nine inches long. These are very common dimensions, and not at all too small.

“Campo uses strong words to speak of what needs to be spoken of, which includes being a brown person and not feeling at home ‘no matter where I go.’ . . . It is a pleasure to read words that do not hesitate or skirt around tough issues. Campo is clear and direct about what it means to him to be Cuban, gay, a poet. A practicing physician, he also writes about the hospital, illness, and caregiving.” —Holly Spaulding, Foreword

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Rafael Campo teaches and practices general internal medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship and a Pushcart Prize. His debut collection of poetry, The Other Man Was Me, won the 1993 National Poetry Series award. His second collection, What the Body Told, won a Lambda Literary Award; his third, Diva, was a finalist in 2000 for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Paterson Poetry Prize (both titles also available from Duke University Press). His work has been published in DoubleTake, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The New Republic, The New York Times Magazine, Out, The Progressive, Salon, Slate, and The Washington Post Book World. He is also the author of a collection of essays now available in paperback under the title The Desire to Heal. He lives in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

“Physicians will be particularly moved by Campo’s weary but respectful regard for his patients in the series of ‘Phone Messages on Call.’ They tell of the times we are catapulted into the lives and suffering of patients we barely know, through the portal of a beeper or the ring of a phone. These wonderful narratives, told in rhyming couplets, smack of the impossibility of our work. So many obstacles: HIV infection, poverty, physical abuse, drug addiction. . . . Landscape with Human Figure reminds us all of how we navigate senses of self, in the face of loss and change, with astonishment and sometimes joy.” — Allan Peterkin, Canadian Medical Association Journal

The second sketch (Fig. 21) shows the appearante of the figure when the eye is only two feet from the ground. Observe how tall it makes the figure FIG. 20.

“Landscape with Human Figure bespeaks compassion, dedication, and the sort of intellectual curiosity you’d expect from an M.D. with a creative writing degree.” — Eric McHenry, The New York Times Book Review

“[Campo’s] fourth and most compelling collection, a candidate for another award. In today’s hustle and bustle, this collection of poems is highly recommended to take your mind off of yourself and learn how others might react to life and death, laughter and sorrow, and love and hate. A must book for all academic and public libraries, as well as the personal collections who truly appreciate great poets.” — H. Robert Malinowsky, AIDS Book Review Journal

“Physicians will be particularly moved by Campo’s weary but respectful regard for his patients in the series of ‘Phone Messages on Call.’ They tell of the times we are catapulted into the lives and suffering of patients we barely know, through the portal of a beeper or the ring of a phone. These wonderful narratives, told in rhyming couplets, smack of the impossibility of our work. So many obstacles: HIV infection, poverty, physical abuse, drug addiction. . . . Landscape with Human Figure reminds us all of how we navigate senses of self, in the face of loss and change, with astonishment and sometimes joy.” —Allan Peterkin, Canadian Medical Association Journal

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When he painted a celebrated hill, and made it appear like a mountain ten times as high, he yet made it seem to be a real mountain, as if he had actually seen it that height. If any one with less knowledge had tried to do the same he would most likely not have made it look like a real mountain at all, but like paint and canvas. One of the marks of a great landscape painter seems to be that he can alter nature well. Stanfield could do so, though not to the same extent as Turner, so could Crome, or to go farther back, Claude, and Salvator Rosa. None of these men could have done such work without having previously obtained a great knowledge of nature from careful and minute study.

Top Posts Photographs: Edward J. Kelty Exhibition: ‘Hold That Pose: Erotic Imagery in 19th Century Photography’ at the Kinsey Institute, Bloomington, Indiana Part 2 Photographic archive: ‘The Gibson archive’ at the Royal Museums Greenwich (RMG) International artists/exhibitions by name & posting Exhibition: ‘Hold That Pose: Erotic Imagery in 19th Century Photography’ at the Kinsey Institute, Bloomington, Indiana Part 1 Exhibition: ‘David Moore: Glimpses of Chewton’ and other art at the Castlemaine Art Gallery and Historical Museum Exhibition: ‘The Naked Truth and More Besides: Nude Photography around 1900’ at the Museum for Photography, Berlin Exhibition: ‘Photography and the American Civil War’ at the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) Exhibition: ‘Photography and the American Civil War’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Exhibition: ‘Jacqui Stockdale: Ghost Hoovanah’ at This Is No Fantasy, Melbourne

“While the settings in this collection vary widely — a blacked-out Cuba; a bridge in Florence; a Fayetteville back road — it was the moments in which Campo focuses on the human figures populating these landscapes that resonated the most with me. . . . Moments like these, in which Campo captures some of the nuances of healing, are woven throughout the collection, and remind us that sometimes creating emotional distance — even in writing poetry — is the only way to steel against pain.” — Ricardo Hernandez, Los Angeles Review of Books

“Landscape with Human Figure bespeaks compassion, dedication, and the sort of intellectual curiosity you’d expect from an M.D. with a creative writing degree.” —Eric McHenry, The New York Times Book Review

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“[T]he majority of Rafael Campo’s verse in Landscape with Human Figure is formal, skillfully using quatrains, couplets, sonnets, and even a sonnet sequence to explore desires between men. . . . [T]he best poems in this collection are simple slices of sexual life, told in quatrains and couplets with slant rhyme, such as ‘Your Black Eyes’ and ‘An Attribution.’ Throughout, the formality of the poems actually increases their sexiness; the tension between formal verse and images of public, oral, and anal sex—odd images in ‘traditional’ verse—creates strains and stresses that are more than just strange; they are erotic. . . . Campo excels at tracing the contours of bodies in heat . . . . Medical images abound, and part of this poet’s ‘making strange’ is his ability to see his desires through the lens of medicine. . . . In Campo’s hands, science invites us to consider the strangeness, the inarticulate fragility of our bodies—and of intimacy.” — Jonathan Alexander, Lambda Book Report

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“[Campo’s] fourth and most compelling collection, a candidate for another award. In today’s hustle and bustle, this collection of poems is highly recommended to take your mind off of yourself and learn how others might react to life and death, laughter and sorrow, and love and hate. A must book for all academic and public libraries, as well as the personal collections who truly appreciate great poets.” —H. Robert Malinowsky, AIDS Book Review Journal

Cloth: $79.95 – In Stock 978-0-8223-2875-9 Paperback: $21.95 – In Stock 978-0-8223-2890-2 Quantity Buy the ebook: Amazon Kindle Apple iBooks Barnes & Noble nook Google Play Kobo

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“Rafael Campo blends several selves into his persona as a poet—Cuban-American, openly gay man, physician, AIDS healer, teacher. Each facet of his life is brilliantly yet formally depicted in his fourth collection, Landscape with Human Figure . . . . Each rereading will yield new wisdom, heart, and insight—great poems, really, reveal their truths with inspired reluctance. Campo is among his generation’s best poets . . . .” —Richard Labonte, The Front Page

For the right introduction of figures, it is necessary that they should be well, even if roughly, drawn. It is best for the student to go through a regular course of figure-drawing from the nude at some school of art. Take every opportunity you have of drawing figures, both from nature and from memory, directly after seeing them, trying, in the latter case, to catch the character more than to make a pretty sketch. Never copy. It utterly stunts imagination and self-dependence. It is important not to do this, as in the long run you must depend upon yourself. A master is of use to beginners to show them how to advance step by step, but a time will come when they will have to run alone or not at all. It is best then to get into the habit of depending on yourself early on. Be self-reliant, but never forget to be at the same time humble, for your best attempts will be far behind the great masters, and very far behind Nature.

“[A]mbitious, elegant poems. . . . [I]n Landscape with Human Figure, Campo’s clear gaze, generous heart and great skill combine to create a resonant and often romantic collection of poems, one that locates and celebrates all our shared ‘outsider’ hearts.” — Kevin Riordan, Philadelphia Gay News

We must have a feeling for perspective in order to place them well as regards standing in the right place for their size. To get this feeling it is as well always to introduce figures by the rules set down in the chapter on perspective (p. 16) whenever a perspective drawing is attempted. Another way is to make some one stand on the spot where the figure is intended to be introduced, so as to get the size, which should then be measured most carefully against the distance.

“Landscape with Human Figure is a striking achievement. I am moved, as his readers are sure to be, by Campo’s wisdom, maturity, depth, heart, and range of experience.” — Grace Schulman

If, like Mr. Marks, the artist has an obliging friend who will sit and stand at various distances, it will be most excellent practice to draw him over and over again. He may not be picturesque, but he will be far better practice than the most picturesque figure put in those places on the picture drawn from nature, but not on the spots in nature indicated. This practice is of course exclusively for study, the drawings are not for show. A beginner need not mind this, as nothing he does will be really worth showing.

“Campo is too modest to portray himself as hero, but we sense the heroic in him . . . . [P]art of Campo’s courage is his willingness to confront his own dark fears . . . . Dr. Rafael Campo is inevitably a poet of heartbreak; yet he remains a poet of accompanying hope.”

The three small drawings, Figs. 17, 18, 19, from sketches taken by Mr. Marks for this very purpose, will serve to illustrate this more fully. The position of a figure six feet high against the horizon at a distance of thirty feet, seen when the artist was standing, is represented in Fig. 17. The same figure at the same distance, drawn when the artist was kneeling, is shown in Fig. 18. Observe how in the latter sketch the landscape is reduced in vertical height, so that the horizon comes about the centre of the back instead of at the shoulders as in the former sketch. The vertical reduction is proportionate throughout the landscape; for example, the spaces from the figure to the gate, and from the gate to the hedge beyond, are reduced in the same proportion as the total height. Now if we had drawn our landscape as in Fig. 18, and then at the place where we have introduced the figure we had put one whose shoulder only reached the horizon, it would look too small and be too small,—though with a single figure this would not be so evident as if there were a second figure correctly put in somewhere out by the gate. If the field is flat, and they were drawn by the artist when he was standing, their shoulders ought to be both on the horizon ; or, if the artist was kneeling, the horizon should cut the same part of their backs.

“Memorable moments can be found throughout Landscape with Human Figure, Campo’s fourth book of elegant, eloquent, resonant poetry. . . . [Campo] is not simply an ‘issues’ poet; he also writes about the everyday life of the heart. And even his polemical poems are often engagingly lyrical and fiercely clever, filled, like all his work, with dextrous wordplay, with all manner of rhyme. . . . No matter the subject, Campo’s poetry is as frank as it is insightful. And it is never less than generous and humane.” —Kevin Riordan, Courier-Post (Cherry Hill NJ)

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To show the effect of placing the eye at different heights relative to the figure, here are two sketches traced from photographs taken nine feet from the sitter at two different elevations (Figs. 20 and 21). The first sketch represents the appearance of the figure with the eye four feet from the ground, or about the height of the eye of an ordinary sitter. The head and upper part of the body appear large for the legs, and the hands look particularly big as they are so close to the eye. Most beginners would have made the hands small, even though they saw them large, and would thus have got the drawing entirely wrong at that part, when the simple way would have been to put the figure farther off.

“Landscape with Human Figure by Rafael Campo is about not having the luxury to look away. An AIDS physician, Campo boldly defies the myth of the kind and courageous care giver. This is not stylish cynicism but a brave admission of his own limitations. He is made speechless by a dying man’s gentle reproach: ‘You can’t know how I feel.” Just as often, Campo peers curiously into the dreamlife of his patients.” — Philip Huang, g POZ

Sometimes an opportunity occurs of an unconscious model, as in the sleeping boatman.

“[Campo’s] contemporary verses bristle with immediacy. . . . The poems explore the contradictions of contemporary culture, seeking to define the place of art in ‘the shrinking world.’ ” —David Caplan, The Columbus Dispatch

The generally received proportion for the human figure is that of Vitruvius, as handed down to us through L. da Vinci, and is given in the annexed illustrations.

All great painters, both of figures and landscape, have begun in the same careful way, and the early works of those who were afterwards freest are hard and generally disagreeable from intense study. The same path of study must be followed by the amateur, and though he will not have time to do as much, let him always carry the work in his pictures or studies as far as he can. Very likely he will end in producing a confused, hard, and disagreeable result. Let him not be discouraged but try again. Take something very simple at first, say a cup and saucer, an apple or other fruit on the table, and go on to things more complicated, such as tree trunks. Then do branches, and finally leaves, and distance beyond them. Above all things let him be careful to get the relative values or tones correctly, for that is the only way of keeping things from confusion.

“[Campo] writes candidly and with pictorial clarity and color about love won, matured, alienated, and lost; powerfully about the burden of dark skin in a white society, especially in the sonnet sequence ‘Afraid of the Dark;’ and with satiric bite and rueful sympathy about his people and motherland in ‘Cuban Canticle in Five Parts.’ The physician can heal his readers as well as himself.” — Ray Olson, Booklist

“A Cuban American gay man in ‘unending exile’ (he practices medicine in Boston), Campo writes compelling poems about patients in the ER, probing relationships between doctor and patient, between a patient’s case ‘history’ and the cultural mainstream, between an immigrant family and aspirations to study medicine, between sexuality and the restraint of lovers. Not unlike Chekhov, another physician-author, the steady-eyed Campo comes to terms with the darkest of human problems (‘the muffled screams/ along a hallway to the absolute’) by fusing empathy and clinical accuracy. Strengthened by his hands-on knowledge of healing and suffering and kept gentle by bearing his burdens with grace, Campo asserts that, despite ‘the harrowed world . . . we are together, we are here to stay.’” — Library Journal

To place a figure well in a landscape without having it on the spot, so that not only it composes well but seems to stand in its place on the ground, is really a most difficult thing. Many people never learn to do it. Their figures are either too large or too small for the place they occupy.

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“[A]mbitious, elegant poems. . . . [I]n Landscape with Human Figure, Campo’s clear gaze, generous heart and great skill combine to create a resonant and often romantic collection of poems, one that locates and celebrates all our shared ‘outsider’ hearts.” —Kevin Riordan, Philadelphia Gay News

“Rafael Campo is an accomplished formalist. I hugely enjoy watching him skitter from sestina to pantoum, sonnet to rhymed couplets, to say nothing of his own nonce forms devised as the situation suggests.” — Maxine Kumin

“[Campo] writes candidly and with pictorial clarity and color about love won, matured, alienated, and lost; powerfully about the burden of dark skin in a white society, especially in the sonnet sequence ‘Afraid of the Dark;’ and with satiric bite and rueful sympathy about his people and motherland in ‘Cuban Canticle in Five Parts.’ The physician can heal his readers as well as himself.” —Ray Olson, Booklist

“Campo uses strong words to speak of what needs to be spoken of, which includes being a brown person and not feeling at home ‘no matter where I go.’ . . . It is a pleasure to read words that do not hesitate or skirt around tough issues. Campo is clear and direct about what it means to him to be Cuban, gay, a poet. A practicing physician, he also writes about the hospital, illness, and caregiving.” — Holly Spaulding, Foreword

“[A] pleasant and accessible fourth collection of poetry . . . . [T]he gentle, regular rhythms of [Campo’s] poems give them a sense of quiet control. . . . Contemplative, hopeful, and heartfelt. . . .” — Chelsey Johnson, Out

Figure Drawing in Open Landscapes: how to draw peopele and other figures outside

After turning over many, if they be well selected, it feels almost impossible to look at sketches except by the very first masters. It is said that ” a photograph cannot lie;” but this is certainly not the fact. A representation of nature to be good must be true in relative values of light and shade, as well as true in drawing. Now in the former particular photographs are often very wrong indeed. The clearer the air and brighter the colours the farther from nature they are. If, for example, we photograph a dahabieh or Nile boat seen in full sunlight with its white sail shining out dazzlingly against the deep blue sky, and reflected with almost equal brilliancy in the water, we shall get a photograph in which the sail will most likely appear slightly darker than the sky, and the reflection will disappear altogether.

Alternative Medicine Diva The Enemy Comfort Measures Only What the Body Told

“[A] powerful collection. . . .” — Gregg Shapiro, Windy City Times

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“Landscape with Human Figure by Rafael Campo is about not having the luxury to look away. An AIDS physician, Campo boldly defies the myth of the kind and courageous care giver. This is not stylish cynicism but a brave admission of his own limitations. He is made speechless by a dying man’s gentle reproach: ‘You can’t know how I feel.” Just as often, Campo peers curiously into the dreamlife of his patients.” —Philip Huang, g POZ

“While the settings in this collection vary widely — a blacked-out Cuba; a bridge in Florence; a Fayetteville back road — it was the moments in which Campo focuses on the human figures populating these landscapes that resonated the most with me. . . . Moments like these, in which Campo captures some of the nuances of healing, are woven throughout the collection, and remind us that sometimes creating emotional distance — even in writing poetry — is the only way to steel against pain.” —Ricardo Hernandez, Los Angeles Review of Books

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“Rafael Campo blends several selves into his persona as a poet—Cuban-American, openly gay man, physician, AIDS healer, teacher. Each facet of his life is brilliantly yet formally depicted in his fourth collection, Landscape with Human Figure . . . . Each rereading will yield new wisdom, heart, and insight—great poems, really, reveal their truths with inspired reluctance. Campo is among his generation’s best poets . . . .” — Richard Labonte, The Front Page

It is best to choose rustic figures for a landscape, for, besides the fact that fashionably-dressed people (especially men) look positively ugly in landscapes, the fashions change so rapidly, that in a year or two the sketch will look ” out of date,” and fail to give pleasure. Children and old people look nearly always well and harmonious in an English landscape, and these luckily, are the most easy to persuade to sit. With a little practice half an hour will suffice to make a very fair study for an introduced figure in a picture, and if the artist is staying in any country place the rustics will soon get used to his asking them to sit, and like it (if not kept too long at a time) when they find that a trifling tip is the result on each occasion.

This subject of relative tones or values is so important that, though it has been touched upon several times previously in this work, it is well worthy of having a chapter devoted to itself.

Landscape with Human Figure Author(s): Rafael Campo Published: January 2002 Pages: 104 Sales/Territorial Rights: World

“In his newest collection of poems, gay Cuban-American doctor Rafael Campo calls on all of his various, even conflicting, selves to render some sort of artistic meaning out of the pain, mystery and loss he encounters in life. His poetry also brings up interesting if not troubling ideas about just what poetry is, especially at the beginning of a new millennium that will have even less time for it than the last one. . . . [T]he house of poetry, like God’s, has many mansions; with this collection Campo proves himself a worthy occupant.” — H.E.B., Frontiers News Magazine

“[T]he majority of Rafael Campo’s verse in Landscape with Human Figure is formal, skillfully using quatrains, couplets, sonnets, and even a sonnet sequence to explore desires between men. . . . [T]he best poems in this collection are simple slices of sexual life, told in quatrains and couplets with slant rhyme, such as ‘Your Black Eyes’ and ‘An Attribution.’ Throughout, the formality of the poems actually increases their sexiness; the tension between formal verse and images of public, oral, and anal sex—odd images in ‘traditional’ verse—creates strains and stresses that are more than just strange; they are erotic. . . . Campo excels at tracing the contours of bodies in heat . . . . Medical images abound, and part of this poet’s ‘making strange’ is his ability to see his desires through the lens of medicine. . . . In Campo’s hands, science invites us to consider the strangeness, the inarticulate fragility of our bodies—and of intimacy.” —Jonathan Alexander, Lambda Book Report

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes the Art Blart blog which reviews exhibitions in Melbourne, Australia and posts exhibitions from around the world. He has a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne and is currently studying a Master of Art Curatorship at The University of Melbourne.

“Campo confirms his celebrated ability to move from formal verses to far-reaching reflections on alienation and the manifestation of internal energies on external surfaces. With emotion and a technical prowess surgical in its delicacy, the book exposes our raw selves and our travels between beauty and terror.” —Rachel DeWoskin, Boston Magazine

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Lastest tweets Photographs: Edward J. Kelty “The aristocrats” wp.me/pn2J2-aLq #blackandwhitephotography #panorama… twitter.com/i/web/status/1… 1 day ago Photographs: Edward J. Kelty “The aristocrats” wp.

me/pn2J2-aLq #photography #art #representation #identity… twitter.com/i/web/status/1… 1 day ago McWilliams would have been 26 years old in this photograph, dancing with the Ballet Theater. George Platt Lynes.

‘R… twitter.com/i/web/status/1… 1 day ago A complete set up… but what art, what social comment! Weegee (1899-1968) ‘The Critic’ 1943 Gelatin silver print… twitter.com/i/web/status/1… 2 days ago Arbus in her own words.

.. and Lisette Model! OMG incredible. The gap between intention and effect. Masters of photo… twitter.com/i/web/status/1… 5 days ago Exhibition: ‘DELETE: Selection and Censorship in Photojournalism’ at Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg (MKG)… twitter.

com/i/web/status/1… 1 week ago

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ARCHIVE OF ALL INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS AND EXHIBITIONS THAT HAVE APPEARED ON THE BLOG AT THIS LINK

“Campo writes restless, worldly narrative poems, often rhyming, that take—and unapologetically engage—the world as it presents itself. . . . [H]is insouciant, call-them-as-I-seem-them descriptions are luminous, addressing the ravages of AIDS, particularly, with care and respect.” —Publishers Weekly

Here you will learn about drawing people & figures outdoors in open landscapes with these tutorials to create great drawings. There are many other Nature Drawing articles, lessons THE ARTICLE IS BELOW.

On taking liberties with nature.—A great service has been done to art by photography. The public are more critical in the matter of character and drawing, and are better able to weed out the bad pictures from the good. At one time artists used to take liberties with nature in a way that would not be permitted for a moment now. The great arch-liberty-taker was Turner. He would put the sun, moon, and stars, into one sky if it helped his composition or interest. He would put trees growing in impossible places, and in making a view of a well-known town would put that which was behind him into the view in front, and he would pile up hills till they were mountains. Any one who now did the same things would not have his pictures looked at. And yet Turner is a great man, and we always gather knowledge and strength from looking at his works. In early days, he copied nature with an almost slavish care, and the knowledge he gained was so great that he was able to take liberties with nature afterwards, and do it well.

“[Campo’s] contemporary verses bristle with immediacy. . . . The poems explore the contradictions of contemporary culture, seeking to define the place of art in ‘the shrinking world.’ ” — David Caplan, The Columbus Dispatch

Gold Award Winner, 2002 ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Award in Poetry

look because the perspective reduces the size of the head and shoulders. If, then, so much difference in the appearance is produced by a difference of only two feet between the heights of point of view, imagine in what a distorted light the figure would appear if the eye were that of a standing man, five feet six inches instead of four feet, from the ground. The head would appear still larger and legs still shorter, and all beauty would disappear.

“Memorable moments can be found throughout Landscape with Human Figure, Campo’s fourth book of elegant, eloquent, resonant poetry. . . . [Campo] is not simply an ‘issues’ poet; he also writes about the everyday life of the heart. And even his polemical poems are often engagingly lyrical and fiercely clever, filled, like all his work, with dextrous wordplay, with all manner of rhyme. . . . No matter the subject, Campo’s poetry is as frank as it is insightful. And it is never less than generous and humane.” — Kevin Riordan, Courier-Post (Cherry Hill NJ)

FIG. 21. EFFECT PRODUCED BY HAVING A FIGURE TOO NEAR THE EYE.

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“In his newest collection of poems, gay Cuban-American doctor Rafael Campo calls on all of his various, even conflicting, selves to render some sort of artistic meaning out of the pain, mystery and loss he encounters in life. His poetry also brings up interesting if not troubling ideas about just what poetry is, especially at the beginning of a new millennium that will have even less time for it than the last one. . . . [T]he house of poetry, like God’s, has many mansions; with this collection Campo proves himself a worthy occupant.” —H.E.B., Frontiers News Magazine

“[A] powerful collection. . . .” —Gregg Shapiro, Windy City Times

The length of the whole figure is represented as divided into eight parts. One goes to the head, three to the body to the fork of the legs, and four to the legs, divided in the middle just below the knees.

Acknowledgments I. Landscape with Human Figure On New Year’s Day Nightfall in Asturias Quatrains for a Shrinking World The Blackouts Ghazal in a Time of War Outside Fayetteville What I Would Give For My Brother’s Wedding Landscape with Human Figure II.

Speak to Me In Praise of Experience October Afternoon, 1986 Oysters Your Black Eyes An Attribution Playing “Fidel and Peron” On Valentine’s Day Last Hours in Florence Speak to Me Poem for My Familiar After Losing Him III.

Afraid of the Dark Afraid of the Dark IV. Undetectable Phone Messages on Call Undetectable Spiritual, ca. 1999 On Thanksgiving The Same Old Place Supernumerary Poem with Fruit Pastries that Allegorically Addresses Death On the Virtues of Not Shaving The Four Humours V.

Questions for the Weather The Age-Old Problem of Sentimental Verse The Couple After the Weekly Telephone Call For a Dear Friend Who Is Grieving Love Poem Written Especially for You Living with Illness Doberman Pinscher, Dreaming Upon Overhearing, “Anyone Can Write Like Elizabeth Bishop” You Can Just See the Cynicism Cuban Canticle in Five Parts On Christmas Eve The Beech Forest In Case of Emergency Landing Questions for the Weather

“A Cuban American gay man in ‘unending exile’ (he practices medicine in Boston), Campo writes compelling poems about patients in the ER, probing relationships between doctor and patient, between a patient’s case ‘history’ and the cultural mainstream, between an immigrant family and aspirations to study medicine, between sexuality and the restraint of lovers. Not unlike Chekhov, another physician-author, the steady-eyed Campo comes to terms with the darkest of human problems (‘the muffled screams/ along a hallway to the absolute’) by fusing empathy and clinical accuracy. Strengthened by his hands-on knowledge of healing and suffering and kept gentle by bearing his burdens with grace, Campo asserts that, despite ‘the harrowed world . . . we are together, we are here to stay.’” —Library Journal

Where the ground descends a little the horizon will come higher, as in Fig. 19, where the figure was thirty feet off. In fact a little rise and fall of the ground will make; so much difference in the relative position of the head of the figure and the horizon, that it is almost impossible to put it in by rule if the ground is at all uneven; yet if figures are placed incorrectly they do not look right. They have to be introduced very much according to the feeling of the artist as to what is right.

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of which we should take advantage. Another example of good rustic figures is given here (Fig. 23). This is also reproduced from another of the clever figure studies of Mr. Marks, and represents two boys, one already asleep, and the other tending in that direction, in the hot sunlight of a summer’s day. But it is seldom that any figures we accidentally find to study ever fit into landscapes that we make away from them. Generally they remain on our hands as mere studies, or are worked into sketches by slight addition of interesting incidents. Special figures must be obtained, as a rule, to sit for introducing into a picture, or they have to be drawn without nature, and great indeed must be the knowledge of an artist before he can do that successfully. They should never be large, and should be more blocked in than drawn in. Animals, again, are even more difficult than figures, and should only be introduced after a great deal of individual study.

“In his fourth and most compelling collection of poetry, physician Rafael Campo confirms his status as one of America’s most important poets. His stunning, candid poems . . . rise with equal beauty from a Boston tenement or a moonlit Spanish plaza, yet remain unafraid to explore and celebrate his identity as a doctor, and Cuban gay man.’” — Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

The length of the hands should equal the length of the face, and the feet should be one-sixth the length of the body.

“Campo confirms his celebrated ability to move from formal verses to far-reaching reflections on alienation and the manifestation of internal energies on external surfaces. With emotion and a technical prowess surgical in its delicacy, the book exposes our raw selves and our travels between beauty and terror.” — Rachel DeWoskin, Boston Magazine

Nearly every beginner has a tendency to make the head of a figure too large, the legs too short, and the feet too small. This arises very much from the fact that people seldom notice any one carefully unless they are standing close by them. They are thus seen in violent perspective, and the head being nearest appears unduly large, with the feet proportionably small. Place the figure at least fifteen feet off when drawing a full-length, or else place it on an elevation, so that your eye is nearly on a level with the centre of the body, as in this way exaggeration by perspective is reduced to a minimum.

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Photographs, especially if they be instantaneous, give a great help to the study of animals, and for a black and white drawing they may be sometimes directly copied. (This may be considered as an exception to the rule given above.) Good photographs are always instructive, the drawing is so beautifully correct in details.

In Landscape with Human Figure, his fourth and most compelling collection of poetry, Rafael Campo confirms his status as one of America’s most important poets. Like his predecessor William Carlos Williams, who was also a physician, Campo plumbs the depths of our capacity for empathy.

Campo writes stunning, candid poems from outside the academy, poems that arise with equal beauty from a bleak Boston tenement or a moonlit Spanish plaza, poems that remain unafraid to explore and to celebrate his identity as a doctor and Cuban American gay man.

Yet no matter what their unexpected and inspired sources, Campo’s poems insistently remind us of the necessity of poetry itself in our increasingly fractured society; his writing brings us together—just as did the incantations of humankind’s earliest healers—into the warm circle of community and connectedness.

In this heart-wrenching, haunting, and ultimately humane work, Rafael Campo has painted as if in blood and breath a gorgeously complex world, in which every one of us can be found.

Human Figure In Drawing In Landscape